RSS Feed

In My Book, Writing a School Improvement Plan IS NOT Busy Work

After a full-week of coming home and staying up past midnight (including two weekends) working on the state mandated School Improvement Plan, we submitted a hard copy to our school district where it will undergo an approval process before it is electronically submitted to the state – 82 days from today.

I have been a member of the School Improvement Plan committee for three years now. At my school, (up until this year) completing it has always been a collaborative labor of love (because at my school, teachers LOVE teaching and WANT to improve their teaching practice and UNDERSTAND the way we are doing school is NOT working). But this year, writing the school improvement plan was more like busy work due to the highly pre-scripted format we followed and the directives we were given.

The plan’s mandated components: our school vision and mission statement, statement of our educational gaps in each academic area, reasons for the educational gap, four goals (reading and writing as one goal, plus math, science and social studies), one objective each goal, four strategies with four activities, the research that supports it, the resources needed to complete the activities, the cost and the staff who are responsible for completing the activities.

We were told that we needed to reduce our 160 page document to 25 pages (or less) as there are only four readers to read 120 plans.

It sounds like a story problem I might give my students: District A has four workers that have 82 days to read 120 plans that total no more than 25 pages. How many pages will each worker read per day? The answer … each worker will read 9.14 pages per day. In the book Around the World in Eighty Days, they travel (at the turn of the century) around the world, by various methods of transportation – including elephants. In 2011, public school readers should be able to read more than 9.14 pages a day, shouldn’t they?

There are loud policy voices calling for international academic standards and assessments bench-marked against other countries’ educational systems with a constant outcry of how far behind US students perform against their global peers. Most current and planned state/federal education initiatives promote academic choice options such as charter schools, international baccalaureate programs, and increased testing/assessment. These efforts, the public is told, will put American students in high paying/high performing professional occupations.

OK, we WANT to improve our teaching practice to address exactly that … and according to the district mandate OUR school’s unique improvement plan NEEDS to be written in 25 words or less … how does that make any real sense?

The good news, we were able to edit our plan from the 160 pages to 82 pages. The bad news is that we were not able to reduce our plan to 25 pages or less (and I am told that some schools have been able to do it, although I can’t comprehend how that is possible).

I am sorry that some reader is now at risk of staying up until midnight to read eighty-two pages that are the fruits of our labor of love – but we are teachers desiring meaningful change and we believe that a school improvement plan should be comprehensible and comprehensive and should include everything our school feels we need to do to ensure that we are leaving no child behind. After all, aren’t we really writing it for the intended audience – ourselves – with the intention of  improving our instruction and assessment practices to better serve our neighborhood children ?

Next year, perhaps “they” will contract someone to write everyone’s plan, you know in the one-plan, one-nation standardization way of “doing school” … then everyone can be on the same page at the same time!  But, to me, standardized school improvement plans just seem to be an oxymoron.

We are raising neighborhood children not corn crops in the Mansanto style of standardizing each kernel! And in my corner of the world, writing about we need to do our job well, can’t be said in 25 pages (or less) or even written in one stone-document because teaching is a blend of art and science and is absolutely a work-in-progress. There is nothing standardized or abbreviated about growing children.

Tomorrow is a new day that brings new problems that will require new solutions and resources that I didn’t imagine (or write down) today. And that is the both the blessing and the curse.

About Maestrasasha

I envision a healthy, flourishing planet and society that sustainably and equitably meets the needs of all its inhabitants through an educational reform movement that is diverse, inclusive, successful, vibrant, and relevant, taking into account the needs, perspectives, and voices of all. Three decades of experience teaching diverse populations ranging in age from infants to nonagenarians. Innovative, talented artist with exhibition experience and art therapy and crisis intervention training; skilled school administrator with expertise in specialized services, sheltered English instruction, art education, curriculum development and early childhood; a proven ability to differentiate common core curriculum, meet the needs of students with learning and language challenges, and a strong background in project-based, art-infused, placed-based and inclusive education seeks to render my knowledge, experience, and expertise in all aspects - starting from organizational management, to policy making, to supporting classroom teachers, to transforming instruction through joyful, engaging and meaningful learning.

6 responses »

  1. Very nice – I work with wikis online mostly. I do occasionally post to various weblogs I am a part of. Look forward to your writing. Best, Mark

    Reply
  2. Excellent writing, Sasha. I can see a BOOK in the making!

    Reply
  3. Great post! Your passion for teaching really comes through! I agree – you can’t condense and standardize a foundational plan without loosing the whole point of making it.
    Maybe in some future universe the staff and administrators will serve and support the front line teaching staff… instead of the other way around…..

    Reply
  4. Very interesting! I was thinking the same thing. I just read a quote about an hour ago: If there is anything that we wish to change in the child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could better be changed in ourselves. – C.G. Jung

    We certainly need more compassion and patience. I suppose with all of this high stake testing and evaluations, we are more apt to be intolerable of our sweet babies. On the other hand, children need to be aware that sometimes they need to focus, sit still, and listen as we cannot be engaging all the time courtesy of our lovely high stakes testing, time consuming progress monitoring, and possibly lack of supplies. You think if we find that right balance, then maybe the kids will give us what we want in return?

    Reply

What is your thought on this subject? Please leave a comment below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: